New book on religion and political movements in the US

Braunstein, Ruth. 2017. Prophets and Patriots: Faith in Democracy Across the Political Divide. University of California Press.

Prophets and Patriots coverProphets and Patriots takes readers inside two of the most active populist movements of the Obama era and highlights cultural convergences and contradictions at the heart of American political life. In the wake of the Great Recession and amid rising discontent with government responsiveness to ordinary citizens, the book follows participants in two very different groups—a progressive faith-based community organization and a conservative Tea Party group—as they set out to become active and informed citizens, put their faith into action, and hold government accountable. Both groups viewed themselves as the latest in a long line of prophetic voices and patriotic heroes who were carrying forward the promise of the American democratic project. Yet the ways in which each group put this common vision into practice reflected very different understandings of American democracy and citizenship.

New Book: The Poor’s Struggle for Political Incorporation

Rossi, Federico M. 2017. The Poor’s Struggle for Political Incorporation: The Piquetero Movement in Argentina. Cambridge University Press.

The Poor's Struggle coverThis book offers an innovative perspective on the ever-widening gap between the poor and the state in Latin American politics. It presents a comprehensive analysis of the main social movement that mobilized the poor and unemployed people of Argentina to end neoliberalism and to attain incorporation into a more inclusive and equal society. The piquetero (picketer) movement is the largest movement of unemployed people in the world. This movement has transformed Argentine politics to the extent of becoming part of the governing coalition for more than a decade. Rossi argues that the movement has been part of a long-term struggle by the poor for socio-political participation in the polity after having been excluded by authoritarian regimes and neoliberal reforms. He conceptualizes this process as a wave of incorporation, exploring the characteristics of this major redefinition of politics in Latin America.

Job Posting: Political Sociology at Florida State University

The Department of Sociology (http://coss.fsu.edu/sociology) invites applications for a tenure track assistant professor position, effective August 2018. We are looking for a scholar with expertise in political sociology and/or social policy who will build on our department’s strengths in inequalities and social justice, health and aging, and demography. Those who study the US or international contexts are equally encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit a letter of application indicating their relevant research and teaching interests, a curriculum vitae, and the names and contact information for three references. Materials should be sent in PDF format to sociology@fsu.edu by September 30, 2017. Questions may be directed to the department chair (jrreynolds@fsu.edu).

Florida State University is a Carnegie Foundation-classified Research I institution. Among its 42,000 students are 8,500 graduate students pursuing over 200 programs of study. Tallahassee is Florida’s capital city, with a metropolitan population of over 375,000. Its principal employers are state government and three higher education institutions, including an HBCU. Florida State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer, and we strongly encourage racial/ethnic minority applicants to apply.

Call for a New ASA Section: Sociology of Reproduction

Are you interested in forming an ASA Section on the Sociology of Reproduction? An increasing number of sociologists are studying reproduction by conducting research on topics such as pregnancy, labor, birth, abortion, contraception, prenatal testing, assisted reproductive technologies, and infertility. Further, the sociological study of reproduction is a critical place of feminist research. Here are a few reasons why an ASA Section on the Sociology of Reproduction is a good idea:

  • According to ASA, “Sections are great for networking with your colleagues and keeping up to date with new developments in your field. Sections write newsletters, conduct panels, receptions and sessions at the Annual Meeting, and connect their members daily through listservs, websites and social media outlets.”
  • ASA sections have official recognition as legitimate areas of sociological inquiry, which helps individuals pitch new courses to teach, request new faculty positions, and legitimate their own research agenda within the area.
  • There is a proposal before the ASA Council to increase the number of sessions controlled by the sections. Such a shift, which appears to have the support of ASA staff, would make it increasingly unlikely that we would be able to continue getting 4-5 regular ASA sessions (as we did in 2017), but also more likely that small sections, such as a section on the Sociology of Reproduction, would be able to get more than the 2 ASA sessions currently promised.

To form a new section, we need to collect 200 signatures of current ASA members on a petition in which the signer agrees, if the section is formed, to pay dues to the section for two years. Dues are typically $5-$10/year.

You can sign the petition with this link: https://tamu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_abjSjMaV21ppG17.

Please encourage other interested ASA members, including graduate students, to sign, too!

For questions, please feel free to email any of the organizers:

Danielle Bessett: danielle.bessett@uc.edu
Shannon Carter: skcarter@ucf.edu
Theresa Morris: theresa.morris@tamu.edu
Louise Roth: lroth@email.arizona.edu
Carrie Lee Smith: Carrie.Smith@millersville.edu

Grant Opportunity: Negotiating Agreement in Congress

The Negotiating Agreement in Congress Research Grants are aimed at scholars who seek to understand the conditions under which political negotiation can be achieved (or not achieved) in Congress and other legislative arenas. The grants provide up to $10,000 of funding for each awardee, to be used for up to one year of research and writing. Applicants must have a PhD in hand by the application deadline and must hold an affiliation with a college or university based in the United States. For more information, please visit www.ssrc.org/nacg or contact democracy@ssrc.org.

Deadline: Sept 15

Eligibility: Applicants must have a PhD in hand by the application deadline and must hold an affiliation with a college or university based in the United States. Additional criteria can be found on our website.