Workshop: Migrants’ and Diaspora Responses to the Rise of Right-Wing Populism

Sponsored by the ERC Diasporas and Contested Sovereignty Project (DCS), September 26, 2017, in London. The workshop, “Migrants’ and Diaspora Responses to the Rise of Right-Wing Populism,” is dedicated to research on how migrant and diaspora communities respond to populist, anti-immigrant and ethno-nationalist movements. We will address research on whether, when and how migrants and diasporas mobilise; what groups or parties they choose as political allies; and whether radical-right parties themselves reach out to certain diasporas while rejecting others, among other questions. Radical-right populist movements have grown more potent in liberal democracies, yet there has been little academic focus on how migrant and diaspora populations react to these parties, although anti-immigration campaigning is at the core of populist activities.

The workshop will be held at the University of Warwick’s London site on September 26, 2017. Those interested in participating should a paper abstract (maximum 300 words) by 25 May, 2017 to Dr. Ben Margulies (b.margulies@warwick.ac.uk) and Dr. Maria Koinova (m.koinova@warwick.ac.uk).

SocArXiv Symposium

SocArXiv will host the inaugural O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium on October 26-27, 2017 at University of Maryland, College Park. We invite social science papers or presentations related to the following themes:

1. Research on any topic that includes open scholarship components. This may entail a demonstration case showing how to do an open scholarship project, providing data and code for results, working with collaborators, or other examples of open scholarship in practice.
2. Research about open scholarship itself. This may include mechanisms for making data and code public, workflow processes, publication considerations, citation metrics, or the tools and methods of open scholarship.
3. Research about replication and transparency. This includes both replication studies and research about replication and reproducibility issues.

Travel stipends of $1,000 will be available to a limited number of presenters. Submissions are due by June 1, 2017. Visit https://socy.umd.edu/centers/socarxiv-o3s-conference for details. Contact: socarxiv@gmail.com

New Book: Oxford Handbook of U.S. Women’s Social Movement Activism

McCamon, Holly, Verta Taylor, Jo Reger, and Rachel Einwohner (eds). 2017. The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Women’s Social Movement Activism. Oxford University Press.

Women in Global Science coverOver the course of thirty-seven chapters, including an editorial introduction, this handbook provides a comprehensive examination of scholarly research and knowledge on a variety of aspects of women’s collective activism in the United States, tracing both continuities and critical changes over time. Women have played pivotal and far-reaching roles in bringing about significant societal change, and women activists come from an array of different demographics, backgrounds and perspectives, including those that are radical, liberal, and conservative. The chapters in the handbook consider women’s activism in the interest of women themselves as well as actions done on behalf of other social groups.

The volume is organized into five sections. The first looks at U.S. Women’s Social Activism over time, from the women’s suffrage movement to the ERA, radical feminism, third-wave feminism, intersectional feminism and global feminism. Part two looks at issues that mobilize women, including workplace discrimination, reproductive rights, health, gender identity and sexuality, violence against women, welfare and employment, globalization, immigration and anti-feminist and pro-life causes. Part three looks at strategies, including movement emergence and resource mobilization, consciousness raising, and traditional and social media. Part four explores targets and tactics, including legislative forums, electoral politics, legal activism, the marketplace, the military, and religious and educational institutions. Finally, part five looks at women’s participation within other movements, including the civil rights movement, the environmental movement, labor unions, LGBTQ movement, Latino activism, conservative groups, and the white supremacist movement.

2016 General Social Survey Data Available

The 1972-2016 General Social Survey cumulative file is now available on our website (http://gss.norc.org/). As of Wednesday April 5, it is also available on the GSS Data Explorer (https://gssdataexplorer.norc.org/).

New GSS Trends Feature: Already available on the GSS Data Explorer you will find the new GSS Key Trends feature.  This dynamic visualization function is designed to provide both researchers and the general public with unprecedented capacity to create graphic views of key trends and user responses over time.

New Book: Women in Global Science

Kathrin, Zippel. 2017. Women in Global Science Advancing Academic Careers through International Collaboration. Stanford University Press.

Women in Global Science cover Scientific and engineering research is increasingly global, and international collaboration can be essential to academic success. Yet even as administrators and policymakers extol the benefits of global science, few recognize the diversity of international research collaborations and their participants, or take gendered inequalities into account. Women in Global Science is the first book to consider systematically the challenges and opportunities that the globalization of scientific work brings to U.S. academics, especially for women faculty.

Kathrin Zippel looks to the STEM fields as a case study, where gendered cultures and structures in academia have contributed to an underrepresentation of women. While some have approached underrepresentation as a national concern with a national solution, Zippel highlights how gender relations are reconfigured in global academia. For U.S. women in particular, international collaboration offers opportunities to step outside of exclusionary networks at home. International collaboration is not the panacea to gendered inequalities in academia, but, as Zippel argues, international considerations can be key to ending the steady attrition of women in STEM fields and developing a more inclusive academic world.

You can connect to Zippel’s recent blogs:
Women and the World in Academia
Sexual Harassment in Research Abroad

Webinar on Critical Realism

As part of the Critical Realism Network Webinar Series, Professor Philip Gorski of Yale University would like to invite you to join the upcoming webinar with Professor Kevin Schilbrack (Department of Philosophy and Religion, Appalachian State University) on Critical Realism and the Academic Study of Religion.

Date: Wednesday, April 19th
Time: 12:00-1:30 pm EST
Click here to register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1033739221691083777

Brief Description:  In this webinar, I’ll explore how critical realism aids our understanding of both scholars who study religious agents and the religious agents themselves. I’ll briefly contextualize the debate among religious studies scholars today about the status of the central conceptual category of “religion”. Some contemporary scholars, influenced by genealogy and deconstruction, argue that religion was not discovered in those cultures but was rather manufactured, imagined, or invented in Europe and then imposed on the rest of the world.  Here, religion is a social construction, a projection of the western imagination. On what grounds can Western scholars retain the concept? In response, I will argue that CR enables us to speak of religion as a real entity, a social structure, that operated even before the word was created. I will consider three arguments for abolishing the category of “religion” and show how CR provides tools with which we can respond to them. Second, how does CR help us understand religious agents? Religious people organize their lives around and claim to experience value-laden realities that those who are not members of their communities typically cannot see. What is needed, then, is a relational ontology where human beings are not independent substances but are rather constituted by their relations.

Summer Schools Call for Applicants

Berlin Summer School

The summer school aims at supporting young researchers by strengthening their ability in linking theory and empirical research. The two-week program creates an excellent basis for the development of their current research designs.

In the first week, we address the key methodological challenges of concept-building, causation/explanation, and micro-macro linkage that occur in almost all research efforts. We strive for a clarification of the epistemological foundations underlying methodological paradigms. In the second week, these methodological considerations are applied to central empirical fields of research in political science, sociology, and other related disciplines. In this second part of the program, participants are assigned to four thematic groups according to their own research topics. The thematic areas covered are: “External Governance, Inter-regionalism, and Domestic Change”, “Citizenship, Migration, and Identities”, “Social Struggle and Globalization”, and “Democracy at the Crossroads”.

The international summer school is open to 50 PhD candidates, advanced master students, and young postdocs. The call for applications is currently open. Applications can be submitted online via the application form on the summer school webpage until March 31, 2017.

Bergen Summer Research School

‘Migration and the (Inter-)National Order of Things. Law, state practices and resistance’, June 12-22 2017.

This interdisciplinary PhD course aims to deepen the understanding of the politics of protection and control of contemporary migration. It asks: How are migrants given different bureaucratic and legal identities (e.g. refugees, stateless persons, irregular migrants) and what are the consequences of such distinctions and labels? What protection does international law and humanitarian institutions offer to different categories of people? What are the spatial, temporal and gendered implications of the protection and control practices aimed at migrants? And, how are the legal and bureaucratic identities, and institutions of migration control, challenged by migrants themselves?

This course is one of six parallel courses in 2017, spanning disciplines within health, humanities, and social sciences. In addition to the courses, there will be a series of joint sessions about research tools for PhD candidates, but also plenary sessions with keynotes, debates, and an excursion.

For more information and for applications, please visit the summer school website.

New Book: Reparation and Reconciliation

Smith, Christi M. 2016. Reparation and Reconciliation: The Rise and Fall of Integrated Higher Education. University of North Carolina Press.

Reparations and Reconciliation cover This is the first book to reveal the nineteenth-century struggle for racial integration on U.S. college campuses. As the Civil War ended, the need to heal the scars of slavery, expand the middle class, and reunite the nation engendered a dramatic interest in higher education by policy makers, voluntary associations, and African Americans more broadly. Through a detailed analysis of archival and press data, Christi M. Smith demonstrates that pressures between organizations–including charities and foundations–and the emergent field of competitive higher education led to the differentiation and exclusion of African Americans, Appalachian whites, and white women from coeducational higher education and illuminates the actors and the strategies that led to the persistent salience of race over other social boundaries.

Reparation and Reconciliation was recently the focus of a profile in Inside Higher Ed. 

New Book: Social Structure and Voting in the United States

Smith, Robert B. 2017. Social Structure and Voting in the United States. Springer.

Social Structure and Voting in the United States coverThis book advances theorizing and research in political sociology drawing upon the writings of Seymour Martin Lipset, Daniel Bell, Juan Linz, Paul Lazarsfeld, and other sociologists and political scientists.  To study how ideologies and social structure affect voting decisions, this book applies contemporary statistical modeling methods: multilevel models, structural equation models, and domain analysis.  The SAS data sets and SAS code can be downloaded from the Springer website for replication, reanalysis, and study.  The coda suggests how the findings bear on the recent election of Donald Trump.

Launch of SocArXiv – Open Access Prepublication for Sociologists

SocArXiv, the open archive of social science, has just launched in beta version. Led by a steering committee of sociologists and librarians, SocArXiv is a free, open access repository for prepublication versions of papers. Created as a not-for-profit alternative to sites like Academia.edu, ResearchGate, and SSRN, SocArXiv is built in collaboration with the Center for Open Science and supported by the Open Society Foundation and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

SocArXiv’s mission is to maximize access to social science – getting it circulating earlier in the process, and getting it out from behind paywalls – and to improve its quality. Since announcing our temporary paper drop site in July, more than 500 papers have been added and downloaded over 10,000 times. We invite you to join us by uploading yours. Right now, SocArXiv offers:

  • Fast, free uploading, with access for all readers
  • Persistent identifiers & citations for every paper
  • Authors keep copyright to their work
  • Link to data & code on the free Open Science Framework
  • Easy social media sharing

More features will be added in the coming months. In the meanwhile, add yours by visiting SocArXiv.org, or learn more at SocOpen.org. Or follow us on Facebook or Twitter.