New Job Posting – Boston College

The Department of Sociology and the International Studies Program at Boston College invite applications for a tenure track assistant professor position. A successful candidate is one whose research, teaching, and advising are relevant to the consideration of global history, culture, and social structure, as well as to the social justice mission of the sociology department’s PhD program.  Scholars with expertise in any geographic area, or those who do transnational or international sociology, are invited to apply.  The tenure line will be located in the sociology department. The position, which begins in Fall 2018, entails half-time undergraduate teaching in International Studies and half-time graduate and undergraduate teaching in the Department of Sociology.  Preference will be given to entry-level applicants, but excellent candidates at the advanced Assistant Professor level will also be considered.

Applicants should apply at https://apply.interfolio.com/42892.  Required documents include a cover letter describing relevant research, teaching accomplishments, and plans; a current CV; two pieces of recent scholarship; and a list of three references that will provide letters of recommendation for applicants that are shortlisted. The screening committee will begin reviewing applications on September 1, 2017, and will continue to review them until the position is filled.

All inquiries should be sent to Andrew Jorgenson, Chair of the Department of Sociology and Chair of the Search Committee, at jorgenan@bc.edu.

Boston College is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, protected veteran status, or other legally protected status. To learn more about how BC supports diversity and inclusion throughout the university please visit the Office for Institutional Diversity at http://www.bc.edu/offices/diversity.

Announcing the Winners of the 2017 Section Awards

Please join us in congratulating the winners of our 2017 Section Awards! Many thanks to the members of our award committees, without whom none of this would be possible. The awards will be given at our business meeting, Monday, August 14 at 5:30pm, Palais des congrès de Montréal, Level 5, 517B.

Distinguished Article Award

Mayrl, Damon and Sarah Quinn. 2016. “Defining the State from Within: Boundaries, Schemas, and Associational Policymaking.” Sociological Theory 34(1): 1–26.

Graduate Student Paper Award
Arar, Rawan. Forthcoming. “International solidarity and ethnic boundaries: using the Israeli–Palestinian conflict to strengthen ethno-national claims in Northern Ireland.” Nations and Nationalism.

 

Distinguished Book Award (Co-Winners)

Vargas, Robert. 2016. Wounded City: Violent Turf Wars in a Chicago Barrio. Oxford University Press.

Zubrzycki, Geneviève. 2016. Beheading the Saint: Nationalism, Religion, and Secularism in Quebec. University of Chicago Press.

New Book!

Religion and Progressive Activism About: New Stories Faith and Politics
(New York University Press, 2017)
Edited by Ruth Braunstein, Todd Nicholas Fuist, and Rhys H. Williams

nyupress.org/books/9781479852901

To many mainstream-media saturated Americans, the terms “progressive” and “religious” may not seem to go hand-in-hand. As religion is usually tied to conservatism, an important way in which religion and politics intersect is being overlooked. Religion and Progressive Activism focuses on this significant intersection, revealing that progressive religious activists are a driving force in American public life, involved in almost every political issue or area of public concern.

This volume brings together leading experts who dissect and analyze the inner worlds and public strategies of progressive religious activists from the local to the transnational level. It provides insight into documented trends, reviews overlooked case studies, and assesses the varied ways in which progressive religion forces us to deconstruct common political binaries such as right/left and progress/tradition.

In a coherent and accessible way, this book engages and rethinks long accepted theories of religion, of social movements, and of the role of faith in democratic politics and civic life. Moreover, by challenging common perceptions of religiously motivated activism, it offers a more grounded and nuanced understanding of religion and the American political landscape.

Reviews

“Social scientists have invested a great deal of energy in trying to understand the religious right, but not nearly enough time and effort has been devoted to the crucial role, in our past and present, of the religious left. This book is thus an enormous contribution and a groundbreaking work. This timely volume shatters the myth of the religious right’s monopoly on faith-based political activism. While acknowledging the difficulties confronted by religious liberals in organizing for social justice, the authors provide a wealth of new evidence-based insights about how to strengthen the progressive religious movement at a time when its witness is badly needed.”

—E.J. Dionne Jr., Author of Why the Right Went Wrong

“Much of our current understanding of religion and politics is based on studies of the activism of conservative, even extremist forms of religious practice. But historically that is not necessarily the most important connection. In the 19th Century progressive religious groups were instrumental to abolitionist and woman’s suffrage movements. And in the current context religious groups have a leading role in many struggles for justice. Braunstein, Fuist, and Williams’ volume brings together some leading scholars of religion to look at some of the most important cases and theorize what they mean for our understanding of religion and social activism.”

—David Smilde, Charles A and Leo M Favrot Professor of Social Relations, Tulane University

Memorial event for James A. Davis at ASA meeting

At the American Sociological Association (ASA) meetings in Montreal there will be a Memorial Event for James A. Davis.

Event Name: Memorial Event for James A. Davis
Event Date and Time: Saturday, August, 12; 6:30pm – 8:10pm
Room Assignment: 514A

New Book: Direct Action: Protest and the Reinvention of American Radicalism

Kauffman, L.A. 2017. Direct Action: Protest and the Reinvention of American Radicalism. Verso.

Direct Action coverWhat happened to the American left after the sixties? Kauffman traces the evolution of disruptive protest over the last forty years to tell a larger story about the reshaping of American radicalism. It examines how movements from ACT UP to Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter have catalyzed change against long odds, winning victories in times of crisis and backlash while creating a distinctive new kind of radical politics in the process. Based on decades of in-depth interviews, archival research, and firsthand experience.

Upcoming Webinar: The Problem of Autonomy

Part of the Critical Realism Network Webinar Series, the upcoming webinar is hosted by Professor Philip Gorski (Department of Sociology, Yale University) and Timothy Rutzou (Post-Doctoral Associate, Yale University) and addresses The Problem of Autonomy.

Wednesday, May 17th, 12:00-1:30 pm EST. Click here to register.

Brief Description: At the recent Values and Human Flourishing conference, a single issue continually emerged: how should we understand autonomy, and what place does it serve within ethical and political projects? Questions about autonomy, social solidarity, human dependency, and interdependency in many ways serve as the bridge between empirical research, social theory, ethics, and politics. Like the topic of structure and agency, the complex relationship between autonomy, dependency, and interdependency is a key problematic of social philosophy and sociology. The long tradition of Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, and Max Weber were all concerned with unpacking this problematic, often without shying away from addressing its moral, ethical, and political implications. Our modern understanding of autonomy is animated by this intellectual history and the many antimonies this tradition has generated.

How might critical realism help us to address or contribute to this contested history? The answer is not clear. In this webinar Gorski and Rutzou will discuss the manner in which critical realism might be able to help us navigate this problematic by providing an ontologically stratified view of self and society, and a complex account of causation. Where Gorski argues for a more Durkheimian turn, Rutzou argues for a more poststructuralist turn. Are such accounts compatible? Incompatible? Does the ontology advocated by critical realism necessarily entail certain ethical and political positions? Do certain positions become incoherent when one adopts a critical realist ontology? Or is critical realism morally, ethically, and politically promiscuous? The webinar will explore these issues.

New Book Series: Princeton Series in Global and Comparative Sociology

Over the past several decades, “globalization” and “internationalization” have become new areas of focus in the social sciences. Many sociologists are no longer content with focusing on a single society as if it were an autonomous social unit, but are keen to explore processes that affect societies across the globe or that can only be understood through systematic comparisons across them. The Princeton Series in Global and Comparative Sociology aims to create a home for books that dare to compare across countries and continents. It welcomes projects written in all macro-comparative traditions in sociology and neighboring disciplines. The series is edited by Andreas Wimmer (Columbia) and curated by Meagan Levinson at Princeton University Press. Members of the advisory board are Julia Adams (Yale), Nitsan Chorev (Brown), Matthias König (Göttingen), Jim Mahoney (Northwestern), John Meyer (Stanford), Gisele Sapiro (EHESS), Saskia Sassen (Columbia), Evan Schofer (UC Irvine), and Lawrence King (Cambridge). Please submit proposals to Meagan_Levinson@press.princeton.edu.

Workshop: Migrants’ and Diaspora Responses to the Rise of Right-Wing Populism

Sponsored by the ERC Diasporas and Contested Sovereignty Project (DCS), September 26, 2017, in London. The workshop, “Migrants’ and Diaspora Responses to the Rise of Right-Wing Populism,” is dedicated to research on how migrant and diaspora communities respond to populist, anti-immigrant and ethno-nationalist movements. We will address research on whether, when and how migrants and diasporas mobilise; what groups or parties they choose as political allies; and whether radical-right parties themselves reach out to certain diasporas while rejecting others, among other questions. Radical-right populist movements have grown more potent in liberal democracies, yet there has been little academic focus on how migrant and diaspora populations react to these parties, although anti-immigration campaigning is at the core of populist activities.

The workshop will be held at the University of Warwick’s London site on September 26, 2017. Those interested in participating should a paper abstract (maximum 300 words) by 25 May, 2017 to Dr. Ben Margulies (b.margulies@warwick.ac.uk) and Dr. Maria Koinova (m.koinova@warwick.ac.uk).

SocArXiv Symposium

SocArXiv will host the inaugural O3S: Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences symposium on October 26-27, 2017 at University of Maryland, College Park. We invite social science papers or presentations related to the following themes:

1. Research on any topic that includes open scholarship components. This may entail a demonstration case showing how to do an open scholarship project, providing data and code for results, working with collaborators, or other examples of open scholarship in practice.
2. Research about open scholarship itself. This may include mechanisms for making data and code public, workflow processes, publication considerations, citation metrics, or the tools and methods of open scholarship.
3. Research about replication and transparency. This includes both replication studies and research about replication and reproducibility issues.

Travel stipends of $1,000 will be available to a limited number of presenters. Submissions are due by June 1, 2017. Visit https://socy.umd.edu/centers/socarxiv-o3s-conference for details. Contact: socarxiv@gmail.com

New Book: Oxford Handbook of U.S. Women’s Social Movement Activism

McCamon, Holly, Verta Taylor, Jo Reger, and Rachel Einwohner (eds). 2017. The Oxford Handbook of U.S. Women’s Social Movement Activism. Oxford University Press.

Women in Global Science coverOver the course of thirty-seven chapters, including an editorial introduction, this handbook provides a comprehensive examination of scholarly research and knowledge on a variety of aspects of women’s collective activism in the United States, tracing both continuities and critical changes over time. Women have played pivotal and far-reaching roles in bringing about significant societal change, and women activists come from an array of different demographics, backgrounds and perspectives, including those that are radical, liberal, and conservative. The chapters in the handbook consider women’s activism in the interest of women themselves as well as actions done on behalf of other social groups.

The volume is organized into five sections. The first looks at U.S. Women’s Social Activism over time, from the women’s suffrage movement to the ERA, radical feminism, third-wave feminism, intersectional feminism and global feminism. Part two looks at issues that mobilize women, including workplace discrimination, reproductive rights, health, gender identity and sexuality, violence against women, welfare and employment, globalization, immigration and anti-feminist and pro-life causes. Part three looks at strategies, including movement emergence and resource mobilization, consciousness raising, and traditional and social media. Part four explores targets and tactics, including legislative forums, electoral politics, legal activism, the marketplace, the military, and religious and educational institutions. Finally, part five looks at women’s participation within other movements, including the civil rights movement, the environmental movement, labor unions, LGBTQ movement, Latino activism, conservative groups, and the white supremacist movement.